Friday, December 23, 2016

Merry and Bright - Day 12!

Welcome back for the final day of the Merry and Bright Quilt-along!

Today we're going to talk about finishing touches and, drum roll please, here's a look at my finished Merry and Bright quilt!



I have to be honest—I adore this quilt!  The color palette is so cheery and I love the combination of the simple, graphic blocks and the sweet, pretty embroidery.  This one is definitely one of my faves!


On to the finishing:

Basting Backing Fabric to Quilt Top/Batting Sandwich:

The next step in the process is to layer your quilt top/batting sandwich with a backing fabric panel measuring at least 34" x 40".  Once again, I chose to use spray basting adhesive to baste the backing fabric to my quilt sandwich.  I smoothed the backing fabric out on a flat surface with the wrong side up and used masking tape to hold it taut.  Then I lightly sprayed the surface with the basting spray, placed the quilt top/batting sandwich on top of it with the batting side down, and smoothed it out, starting in the center and working outwards.  Then I pulled up the tape, flipped all three layers of the quilt sandwich over, and made sure it was nice and smooth on the back side.

If you'd like to use a different method of basting your quilt, please feel free to do so!  One way or the other, it's time to baste the backing to the back of your quilt sandwich.


Quilting Inner Border:

I quilted my inner background fabric border using two colors of embroidery floss and a big running stitch.  This method matches the look of the embroidery that we used on the sashing strips, but it is actually quilting because we're stitching through all three layers now.  This helps to hold the layers of the quilt together and because it's a running stitch, it looks just fine on the back of your quilt.

After placing my quilt sandwich in a quilting hoop (basically a big embroidery hoop), I used two strands of floss and the same needle that I used for all of my embroidery to do the big stitch quilting.  I stitched ¼" inside the background fabric inner border seams.  You can mark your lines prior to stitching if you like, but I could actually see the shadow of my seam allowances through the background fabric and just ran my stitching along those lines.  Easy peasy!

Your stitches should measure between ⅛" and ¼", but really the stitch length matters less than keeping them consistent.  And finally, as in regular quilting, bury your knots between the layers of your quilt.



Final Touches:

The last thing I did before binding my quilt, was to machine quilt in the ditch on either side of the 4 embroidered sashing strips with a walking foot and white thread to match my background fabric.  This quilting doesn't really show up much, but I added it to help hold the layers of the quilt together.  Then I decided that because my quilt was sufficiently stabilized and charmingly embellished, it was (finally!!) time to bind!

If you'd like to further quilt or embellish your quilt, please do so!  My mom is thinking of adding a star button to the top of one or more of her Christmas trees and for a while contemplated decorating the trees with additional embroidery (if you choose to add more embroidery, make sure you do it before you layer the backing onto your quilt).  You could also use quilting to add texture to the trees, the ornaments or even the house roofs.  The options are many and an opportunity for you to further personalize your quilt. Or maybe, like me, you'll step back and think "that'll do!"


So that wraps up my 2016 Merry and Bright Quilt-along!  (please excuse the little Christmas pun, but I've been waiting all month to write that!!)  I have truly enjoyed sharing this project with you all and I've especially loved connecting with you via email, Facebook and Instagram!  What a treat to be able to see your progress and to know that we were actually quilting along together!

I'd love to see pictures of your quilts when they're finished!  You can email them to me at jendalyquilts@gmail.com or please tag me @jendalyquilts when you post your pics on Instagram or Facebook.



In the meantime, thank you all so much for following along with this year's quilt-along!  Happy Holidays and may all your days be Merry and Bright!

Cheers!  Jen

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

Merry and Bright - Day 11

Happy First Day of Winter!

And Happy Day 11 of the Merry and Bright Quilt-along!

Today we're embroidering our last sashing strip.  We'll be using the back stitch and French knots for some garland-y stitching.  Here's a peek:



I love today's stitching—it's simple and fast, but oh so pretty!


Let's start with the marking:
  1. Referring to the diagram below, mark a horizontal line in the center of your sashing strip along its entire length.  Note:  the center of your strip should be ⅝" below the upper seam and ⅝" above the lower seam.
  2. Starting at the right edge of your sashing strip, make a mark ¼" below the upper seam and ½" in from the right seam.
  3. Move left 1" from the mark made in step 2 and make another mark ¼" below the upper seam and 1½" in from the right seam.
  4. Continue in the same manner moving left and making a mark every inch along the length of the sashing strip (always ¼" below the upper seam).
  5. Starting at the right edge of your sashing strip, make a mark ¼" above the lower seam and 1" in from the right seam.
  6. Move left 1" from the mark made in step 5 and make another mark ¼" above the lower seam and 2" in from the right seam.
  7. Continue in the same manner moving left and making a mark every inch along the length of the sashing strip (always ¼" above the lower seam).
  8. Draw a gently curving line between the center line and each of the marks created in steps 2-7.  Note:  I started each of my curved lines along the center line ½" right of the mark I was connecting to.



Embroider Garland:
(Note:  if you need a quick refresher on the stitches, we first used the back stitch on Day 9 and the French knot on Day 10.)
  1. Place your marked quilt top/batting sandwich in an embroidery hoop.
  2. Thread an embroidery needle with two strands of green embroidery floss.
  3. Referring to the diagram above, back stitch along the center and curved lines.
  4. Using 2-3 strands of red embroidery floss, stitch a French knot at the end of each of the curved lines on the marks created in steps 2-7 in the marking instructions above.

And voilĂ !



I think it's the simplicity of this garland/vine that makes it so striking and the perfect way to finish up our sashing strips.

If you've enjoyed embellishing your quilt with embroidery, make sure to check out my free patterns. I've got several fun little projects that incorporate stitching, and if you'd like a slightly larger quilt that's great for stitching on the go, you can find a tutorial for my Happy table runner at the Moda Bake Shop.



I can't believe it, but we've almost reached the end of the Merry and Bright Quilt-along!  Hope to see you back here on Friday for Day 12!!


Monday, December 19, 2016

Merry and Bright - Day 10

Happy Monday and welcome back for Day 10 of the Merry and Bright Quilt-along!

Today we'll work on sashing strip #3.  We're making diamonds with a simple straight stitch and sprucing them up with a French knot in each center.

Here's a look at today's stitching:



First let's mark our sashing strips:
  1. Referring to the diagram below, make a mark ⅜" in from the left edge of your strip and ¼" down from the upper edge of your strip.
  2. Make a second mark ¾" to the right of the mark made in step 1—again the mark should be ¼" down from the upper edge of your sashing strip.
  3. Continue in same manner, making marks every ¾" along the length of the sashing strip (always ¼" down from the upper edge).  The last mark should end up ⅜" from the right edge of your sashing strip.
  4. Repeat steps 1-3 along the bottom edge of your sashing strip—this time all marks should be ¼" from the bottom edge of the sashing strip.
  5. Make a small mark at the center of the left edge of your sashing strip.  The mark should be ⅝" from the top and bottom seams.
  6. In the same manner, make a mark every ¾" along the center and length of your sashing strip.



Embroider Diamonds:  
  1. Place your marked quilt top/batting sandwich in an embroidery hoop.
  2. Thread an embroidery needle with two strands of embroidery floss.
  3. Referring to the diagram below, start at the top and bring your needle up at point A and down through point B.
  4. Bring your needle up at point C and down again through point B.
  5. Bring your needle up at point D and down through point C.
  6. Bring your needle up at point A and down through point D.
  7. Bring your needle up at point E and down again through point D.
  8. Bring your needle up at point F and down again through point D.
  9. Continue in same manner until you've stitched diamonds across the lenght of your sashing strip.



Embroider French Knots in Diamond Centers:
  1. Thread an embroidery needle with a least two strands of floss.  If you'd like your knots to be bigger, you can use three strands of floss.
  2. Bring your needle up through the center of a stitched diamond.
  3. Wrap the floss two or three times around the end your needle.
  4. While gently pulling the floss so that the wrapped floss tightens on the needle, insert the needle right next to the point where you brought your needle up through your work.
  5. Pull your floss through to the back until a knot is formed.
  6. Move over to the next diamond center and repeat steps until all diamonds have a French knot stitched in the center.



That's it for today!  Pretty, isn't it?!  One more sashing strip to go and then we'll talk about finishing touches!


And by the way, if you're looking for ideas for a last-minute handmade gift or if the polar vortex is getting you down, I've got the solution!  It's my Posies mini quilt!  You can find the free tutorial for this sweet little project now at the Moda Bake Shop



See you back here Wednesday for Day 11!

Saturday, December 17, 2016

Merry and Bright - Day 9

It's Saturday and Day 9 of the Merry and Bright Quilt-along!  It's snowing this morning in New Hampshire and I'm definitely feeling merry!  If you're like me, you've got a full weekend planned, so today's stitching is fast and easy!

We're moving on to sashing strip #2 and the back stitch!



I LOVE the back stitch!  It's perfect for both straight and curved lines—even lettering—and once you get the hang of it, it moves along really quickly.


Let's start with marking our sashing strips:
  1. Starting at one edge, make a small mark on the top and bottom edges of the sashing strip at every 1½" along its length.  Your sashing strip should measure 1¼" x 21", so you should end up with 26 little marks (2 up and 2 down at each 1½" point).
  2. At each 1½" mark and at the left and right edges of the sashing strip, make a little mark " down from the top of the sashing strip and " up from the bottom of the sashing strip.
  3. Draw the beginning of a gentle curve at each of the marks made in step 2.
  4. Extend the curves drawn in step 3 until they connect in the middle of the sashing strip.
  5. Work your way down the strip drawing two wavy lines that intersect in the middle of the sashing strip.




Embroider Back Stitched Wavy Lines:
  1. Place your marked quilt top/batting sandwich in an embroidery hoop.
  2. Thread an embroidery needle with two strands of embroidery floss.
  3. Settle down in front of a holiday movie with a cup of tea at the ready.
  4. Referring to the diagram below and beginning your stitching at the right side of the sashing strip (if you're right handed!), bring needle up at point 1 and back down at point 2.
  5. Move left and bring your needle up at point 3 and then back down at point 1.
  6. Continue in the same manner until you've stitched both wavy lines, one green and one red.




That's all for today!  Fast and easy as promised.  Have a great weekend and I'll be back here again on Monday for Day 10!

Cheers!

Thursday, December 15, 2016

Merry and Bright - Day 8

Welcome back for Day 8!  Today we begin embroidery!!

Simple embroidery is one of my favorite ways to embellish my quilt, and when I was designing this quilt-along project, I realized that the background fabric sashing strips and inner borders were the perfect canvases for a bit of stitching.

Today we'll be embroidering the sashing strip between the Christmas tree blocks and the ornament blocks with a large star stitch.

Here's a peek:



Before we get started, you'll need to gather:

  • 34" x 40" piece of batting
  • spray basting adhesive (optional)
  • washout marking pen
  • quilting rulers
  • embroidery floss to match your assorted prints
  • embroidery needles
  • washout marking pen
  • quilting rulers
  • embroidery hoop



Layering/Basting Quilt Top and Batting: 

First you'll need to layer your quilt top with a 34" x 40" piece of batting.  This step is optional, but I like to do my embroidery through both the quilt top and batting for two reasons.  First, it gives my stitching a bit of dimension, and second, the batting prevents the embroidery floss on the back of your work from showing through on the front, especially with a light colored background fabric like we're using on this project.  I don't layer the backing fabric with the top and batting before embroidering because the back of the embroidery wouldn't look very good exposed on the back of the quilt.

To baste my quilt top and batting, I used spray basting adhesive between the layers.  It's fast and easy and really keeps your work still during embroidery.  To spray baste my layers, I smoothed the batting out on a flat surface, and used masking tape around the edges to hold it taut (but not stretched) and still.  Following the directions on the can, I lightly sprayed the surface of the batting with the spray basting adhesive, placed the quilt top on top of it, and smoothed it out starting from the center and working my way towards the edges. For added insurance, you can safety pin through both layers around the outside edge of your quilt top.


Marking Sashing Strip for Embroidery:

Once you've basted your quilt top and batting ONLY using your preferred method, it's time to mark your quilt.  We'll be marking as we go over the next few days.  Note:  before marking your quilt, take a moment to test that you'll be able to remove the marks from your background fabric.  Just take a small scrap of your fabric, draw on it with your pen and attempt to wash it out with the method that you plan to use.  If the marks don't show once your scrap of background fabric has dried, you're good to go!  By the way, to remove my marked lines, I like to lightly mist the marked lines with a spray bottle, then blot the quilt with a clean tea towel to remove the excess water and let the quilt dry flat.

To mark your sashing strip:

  1. Starting at one edge, make a small mark on the top edge of the sashing strip at every inch along its length.  Your sashing strip should measure 1¼" x 21", so you should end up with 20 little marks.
  2. At each inch mark, draw a ¾" long vertical line beginning and ending ¼" away from the upper and lower seams of the sashing strip.
  3. Draw a ¾" long horizontal line perpendicular to the line drawn in step 2 and intersecting its center.
  4. Draw an "x" at the intersection of the lines drawn in steps 2 and 3.  The two lines of the "x" should measure ½".



If you're worried about the "x" being straight, here's a quick tip:

Take a ruler with a 45° line on it and align the 45° line along a horizontal seam line on your quilt.  In the photo below, I've aligned the 45° line up with the bottoms of my trees.  Then use a second ruler pressed up against the first to measure and mark a ½" line.  


Flip your rulers, realigning your 45° line with a vertical seam line on your quilt and mark a second ½" line.



Embroider Star Stitch (a.k.a. the fun part):
  1. Place your marked quilt top/batting sandwich in an embroidery hoop.
  2. Thread an embroidery needle with two strands of embroidery floss.
  3. Referring to the diagram below, start at the top and bring your needle up at point A and down through the center at point B.
  4. Bring your needle up at point C and down again through the center at point B.
  5. Continue in the same manner, stitching in a clockwise directions until you've created a star.
  6. Secure your floss in the back of your work and move on to the next star.  Note:  I used 4 different colors of embroidery floss for my stars, alternating red and green.





And that's it!  20 little stars all in a row!  I love the color and texture they add to the quilt—so pretty!

I'll see you back here Saturday for Day 9!  Happy stitching!

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

Merry and Bright - Day 7

I can't believe it's already December 13th!!  I'm wildly behind on my Christmas preparations, but I'm happy anyway because I'm having so much fun with this Quilt-along!

It's Day 7 and today we're going to finish piecing our quilt tops!!


We're adding an inner border and pieced outer borders today, and I really love how they finish off the quilt!  Very merry!


For your borders, you'll need to gather:
  • 58—assorted print 2½" x 2½" squares (if you pre-cut your FQs, you should have at least 10—2½" x 2½" squares from each of your 6 assorted prints left over)

And from the 9" x 30" background fabric strip that you cut and reserved on Day 1, further cut:
  • 2 borders 2" x 27½"
  • 2 borders 2" x 24½

Finish quilt center:

1. First, stitch 1—2" x 27½ background fabric border to the left and right sides of your quilt center.  Press seam allowances towards the background fabric border.  Then stitch 1—2" x 24½ background fabric border to the top and bottom of your quilt center, again pressing seam allowances towards the background fabric borders.



2.  Next lay out 2 pieced borders of 15—assorted print 2½" x 2½" squares each (for the sides of your quilt) and 2 pieced borders of 14—assorted print 2½" x 2½" squares each (for the top and bottom of your quilt) as shown:


You can lay out your assorted print squares randomly or in an organized pattern—totally up to you.  I planned to start with a red square in the upper left hand corner of my quilt and to work clockwise around the quilt, repeating the same order of prints.  When I tried this out, I ended up with red print squares in both the upper and lower left hand corners and green print squares in both the upper and lower right hand corners.  I didn't want that, so I pulled out some graph paper, assigned each print a number and rehearsed different layouts.  The following is what I decided on:



3.  Once you arrive at a layout that you're pleased with, stitch your 4 border strips, pressing seam allowances all in one direction.



4.  Stitch 1 longer pieced border (15 squares) to either side of the quilt, pressing seam allowances toward the inner background fabric border.  And finally, stitch 1 shorter pieced border (14 squares) to the top and bottom of the quilt, again pressing seams towards the inner background fabric border.

Finally, the remodled red house block makes it back into the photos!!


And voilĂ !!  Your quilt top is complete!!  Well done you!!  

BUT, the quilt-along is not over yet!  Be sure to check back in on Thursday for Day 8 of the Merry and Bright Quilt-along.  We'll be changing things up a bit and moving on to embroidery!  Can't wait!!

Sunday, December 11, 2016

Merry and Bright - Day 6

Welcome back for Day 6!  Today's a big day because after 5 days of piecing blocks, we're going to assemble our quilt centers!  So exciting!!

Without further ado, here's where we're headed...



As you may have guessed, we're making a row quilt!  Ta da!!

It looks like we've got a lot of work ahead of us today, but I think you'll find that it comes together really well.


Here's what you'll need to assemble your quilt center:

Gather all of your blocks.  You should have:
  • 7 pinwheels (Day 1)
  • 7 ornaments (Day 2)
  • 6 Christmas trees (Day 3)
  • 6 gifts (Day 4)
  • 4 houses (Day 5)
  • and a partridge in a pear tree (just kidding!)

From your background fabric, cut:
  • 3—1" x 6¼" rectangles

And from the 8" x 23" background fabric strip that you cut and reserved on Day 1, further cut:

  • 4 strips 1¾" x 21½"





Now that you have all of your components, you may want to take a few minutes to lay out your quilt center on a design wall or other flat surface.  This step actually took me longer than a few minutes because I kept oohing and aahing over my blocks.  You'd think I would have picked up on the fact that my red house's door was in the wrong place at this point, but no....  In any event here's what my design wall looked like when I finished.




Once you are happy with your layout, it's time to assemble your quilt center.  Let's start at the top:

1.  Stitch your 6 Christmas trees in a row.  If you haven't already done so, carefully remove the foundation paper from behind the trees.  Press seams open.


Your row of Christmas trees should measure 5¾" x 21½ unfinished.




2.  Stitch your 7 ornaments in a row.  Before stitching this row, I took my green ornaments and repressed the seam allowance between the snowball block and the ornament tops towards the ornament tops in order to help the seams nest a bit better with the adjacent red ornament blocks.  After stitching your row, press the seams open.


Your row of ornaments should measure 4" x 21½" unfinished.




3.  Gather your 4 houses and 3 background fabric 1" x 6¼" rectangles and lay out in a row with 1 background fabric 1" x 6¼" rectangle between each house.  Stitch and press seams towards the background fabric 1" x 6¼" rectangles.


Your row of houses should measure 6¼" x 21½" unfinished.




4.  Stitch your 7 pinwheels in a row.  Press seams open.



Your row of pinwheels should measure 3½" x 21½" unfinished.




5.  Stitch your 6 gifts in a row.  Once again, you may want to take every other block and repress the seam allowance between the bow and box units, in order to help the seams nest together well.  Press seams open.



Your row of gifts should measure 5" x 21½" unfinished.




6.  Now stitch 1 background fabric 1¾" x 21½" strip to the bottom edge of each of the Christmas tree, ornament, house, and pinwheel rows.  Press seam allowances towards the background fabric strip.




7.  And finally, stitch together all of the above units as shown, pressing seam allowances towards the background fabric strips.  Your assembled quilt center should measure 21½" x 27½" unfinished.



Yay!  You did it!  Your quilt center is finished!  Congratulations!

I'll see you back here Tuesday for Day 7.  We've got a bit more piecing to do before we move onto embroidery.  Can't wait!!

Saturday, December 10, 2016

Oops - Quick Correction for Merry and Bright - Day 5



Notice anything wrong with this little house?



Argh!  The door is in the wrong place.  The above house should look like this...



It's a subtle difference, so subtle in fact that I didn't pick up on my error until yesterday morning as I went to post Day 5 and AFTER I had assembled my entire quilt top!!!  NOOOOO!!!!!!

I frantically remade a new house block yesterday and updated the photos, but I missed an error in the instructions for assembling the main house unit.  Thankfully my mom picked up on it!


In my original post, which you may have received by email, I incorrectly wrote that area A6 was the door and should be covered by a third print 1½" x 3" rectangle because, when in fact area A5 is the door and should be covered by a third print 1½" x 3" rectangle.  Area A6 should be covered by a second print  1½" x 3" rectangle.  The instructions are now correct on my Day 5 blog post, but I thought I should mention my little mistake just in case you're working from an emailed version of the post.

Here, again, are the correct instructions for paper piecing the main house unit:

Area A1 is the window and should be covered with 1—print 1½" x 2½" rectangle.
Areas A2, A3, A4, A6, A7, and A8 should be covered with patches of a matching print in the following sizes (I'll refer to this print as the "second print" and it should be different than the print that you used for the window(unit A1)):
  • A2/A3—second print 1½" x 2½" rectangle
  • A4/A6—second print 1½" x 3" rectangle
  • A7—second print 1½" x 4½" rectangle
  • A8—second print 2¼" x 3½" rectangle
Area A5 should be covered with 1—third print 1½" x 3" rectangle

I'm hopeful that you're getting this update on time or that you picked up on the error on your own.  If you went by the picture of the green house that I posted yesterday, you should be all set!


And now, because I can't live with it, I've got to go rip apart my entire quilt top all because of one tiny green door.  Don't you just love quilting!!!

Friday, December 9, 2016

Merry and Bright - Day 5

It's Friday and Day 5 of the Merry and Bright Quilt-along!

And today we're making Christmas houses!



We're paper piecing one last time, and the house block foundation pattern we're using today is made of three units—one for the main part of the house, one for the roof, and one for the chimney.  It looks like this:


You'll need to print off 4 sets of the foundation pattern—sorry, this time I could only fit one per page.  Click here for the pdf of the foundation pattern.  Before you begin, make sure the main house unit foundation pattern measures 2" x 4" from darker innermost line to darker innermost line (3" x 5" from outside line to outside line.  If the main house pattern is correct, the roof and chimney will be as well.

And once again, please refer to the detailed paper piecing instructions I posted on Day 3 if you need a quick refresher.


For your house blocks, you'll need to gather and cut (note:  if you didn't pre-cut your FQs, no worries, I'll tell you below the patch sizes you'll need for each unit of the house block):

Gather your stacks of:
  • assorted print 1½" x 1½" squares
  • assorted print 1½" x 2½" rectangles
  • assorted print 1½" x 3" rectangles
  • assorted print 1½" x 4½" rectangles
  • assorted print 2¼" x 3½" rectangles
  • assorted print 3" x 5" rectangles


From your background print, cut:

4—1¾" x 1¾" squares
4—1¾" x 4½" rectangles
8—2" x 3½" x rectangles




Because these house blocks are a bit more complicated than our previous blocks, it may help you to roughly lay out your various patches before you being sewing to help you decide which prints you'd like to use for your windows, doors, houses, roofs and chimneys.  If you pre-cut your FQs, you have more patches than you need, so have fun playing around with some different combinations.  

Let's take one block and each unit one at a time.


Here's the foundation pattern for the main house unit.


Area A1 is the window and should be covered with 1—print 1½" x 2½" rectangle.

Areas A2, A3, A4, A6, A7, and A8 should be covered with patches of a matching print in the following sizes (I'll refer to this print as the "second print" and it should be different than the print that you used for the window(unit A1)):
  • A2/A3—second print 1½" x 2½" rectangle
  • A4/A6—second print 1½" x 3" rectangle
  • A7—second print 1½" x 4½" rectangle
  • A8—second print 2¼" x 3½" rectangle
Area A5 should be covered with 1—third print 1½" x 3" rectangle


Got it?  Ok, now on to the roof unit.


Area B1 should be covered with a fourth print—3" x 5" rectangle
Area B2 should be covered with a second print (the same as the print used for most of the house on the main house unit)—2¼" x 3½" rectangle
Areas B3 and B4 should be covered with 2—background fabric 2" x 3½" rectangles


Finally, the easiest, the chimney unit.


Area C1 should be covered with a fifth print 1½" x 1½" squares
Area C2 should be covered with a background fabric 1¾" x 1¾" square
Area C3 should be covered with a background fabric 1¾" x 4½" rectangle


Assemble house blocks:

Once you've finished your main house, roof and chimney units, stitch them together as shown.


Carefully remove the paper from behind your work and press the seams allowances upwards (i.e. press the seam allowance between the main house and roof towards the roof, and the seam allowance between the roof and the chimney towards the chimney).

Repeat steps to make 4 house blocks measuring 5" x 6¼" unfinished.



Phew!  I know these house blocks have a lot of moving parts, but aren't they worth it!!  Once you finish building your little houses, make sure you celebrate!  Pour yourself an egg nog or a glass of wine—unless, of course, it's still morning!


But before you go, I'd like to share a photo of Katherine's version of last year's "Peace on Earth" Mystery Quilt.  She turned her little quilt into a pillow by adding an extra border to either side of her project!  What a great idea, Katherine!  It's beautiful!!



Have a great weekend and I'll see you back here Sunday for Day 6!